Separation Anxiety Disorder

Separation Anxiety Disorder


Separation anxiety disorder is the most common pediatric anxiety disorder. It is typically found in children and can precede other symptoms or mental health issues in adolescence and adulthood. Separation Anxiety is rooted in normal development and is typically outgrown by age three, but there are some cases of adolescents and even young adults displaying symptoms. This disorder is most commonly characterized by extreme, frequent distress at the prospect of being away from home or their parents. Sometimes this fear is supplemented by fears about losing parents to illness or being taken away by kidnappers. Children will also refuse to be away from home, refuse to be home alone without a parent, and may even experience nightmares or physical symptoms (headaches, stomachache) when faced with the prospect of being separated.

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Separation Anxiety in Children

There is a large body of work spanning decades suggesting that how children are cared for in their first 5 years can have a large effect on their interpersonal interactions with peers and partners both early and later in life. This work implicates separation anxiety often in its findings. However, separation anxiety can also impact children’s interactions with themselves, notably through self-image. When a toddler feels anxious about their connection to their parents, such that they worry about the concept of the parent leaving, that feeling can bleed into other areas of their life as the circle of things they need or interact with becomes larger.

As always, eating disorders that have roots in separation anxiety are often built on stress and pressure surrounding meal time. Even young children, down to even age five, have a sense of self image and a serious understanding of the effect food can have on the body. Pediatric eating disorders can also be catalyzed by things like bullying at school and choking instances, further connecting the bridge between pediatric anxiety and eating disorders.

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Separation Anxiety in Adolescents

While it is certainly most common that separation anxiety is grown out of in childhood, it is by no means always the case. It is estimated that around 3% of 12-14 year olds are diagnosed with separation anxiety, with that number decreasing to 1.6% in 14-16 year olds. While this does not represent a high percentage, this amounts to over 1 million adolescents suffering from this condition.

Teens with separation anxiety often express apathy about leaving the house or going to social events, even when they often won’t admit to the source of that apathy being leaving their parents. They may also express overwhelming fear about something happening to their loved ones or themselves, which keeps them separated indefinitely or permanently. They may refuse to sleep away from home or even complain of physical symptoms like head or stomach aches when confronted with the prospect of leaving home.

While often residual from untreated separation anxiety in childhood, this is not always the root cause for teens. Separation anxiety can also be brought on by the sudden death of a loved one, intense chronic stress, natural disasters and global pandemics. The effects of this disorder if left untreated can also affect patients into adulthood.

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Separation Anxiety in Adults

Adult separation anxiety looks very similar to that of adolescents. Adults may experience intense sadness or fear when away from loved ones. They may have difficulty concentrating and can even have panic attacks as a result. Adults with separation anxiety may become social recluses, or else have persistent issues with socially derived anxiety.

The causes for adults can be the same as teens: death of loved ones, traumatic environmental effects. But there are also sufferers for whom treatment was never an option, or never fully pursued. In fact, it is likely that due to the low percentage of people diagnosed, and the illness’s similarity in symptoms to other disorders, many additional people have trouble being correctly diagnosed.

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Separation Anxiety as a Precursor to Eating Disorder

All of this information is to reiterate that early recognition and treatment is crucial to effective recovery from disorders of both eating and anxiety. Anxiety surrounding leaving the parents or leaving loved ones can quite easily develop into anxieties about other, or multiple, sources. For example, research suggests that separation anxiety can be a powerful predictor of anorexia and agoraphobia in teenagers and adults. The basic mechanism suggested by this is that specific anxieties can grow or fester over time if left untreated, affecting other, possibly more general aspects of a child, adolescent, or adult’s life.

By identifying early potential precursors, like separation anxiety, parents and clinicians can lay the best ground work to construct effective coping mechanisms for other, associated issues down the developmental road. Often, skills learned in CBT, DBT, or exposure therapies can also be applied to a myriad of conditions which further strengthens the patient’s ability to endure and thrive when faced with new symptoms or issues.

When these conditions are not effectively treated, they can make downstream symptoms and conditions that develop more difficult to get ahead of. It is entirely common, and in some instances likely, that an adult with an eating and/or anxiety disorder was once a teenager with an eating and/or anxiety disorder who never quite got the full help they might’ve needed.

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How do I begin?


Our team is dually and expertly trained in the Treatment of Eating Disorders and DBT for Mental Health. Our Evidenced-Based approaches include FBT, CBT-E, DBT-ED, and Comprehensive DBT for co-occurring mental health conditions. Our outpatient practice has helped Children, Teens and Adults achieve full Eating Disorder Recovery and Mental Health Stability for over 25 years.

1

Schedule your 15 minute free phone consultation

This phone screening is highly confidential to help determine if coming to the Resilience practice is the best course for you or your loved one.

2

Complete an Expert and Comprehensive Intake

During your intake appointment we will gather more information to identify your stressors and needs. And work with you to develop your resilience treatment plan.

3

Get connected with Your Personalized Care Team

Meet with a practitioner to get started on your journey of healing and wellness you know you deserve.

Start Your Path To Recovery


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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

At Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery, we focus on treating mental health disorders that contribute to eating disorders through the use of Dialectic Behavioral Therapy (DBT). One of the associated mental disorders that we focus on is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). In addition to treating children, teens, and adults, we also provide family therapy services. This page is dedicated to helping you understand the basics of PTSD and how we can help you if you suffer from this disorder.

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder(PTSD)?


It is natural for anyone who experiences a traumatic event to go through a grieving process, however, those who are unable to move forward have PTSD. Post traumatic stress disorder is a mental health disorder in which you or a loved one have experienced a traumatic event that develops unhealthy triggers and makes it difficult to cope or live day to day. Experiencing symptoms for more than a month is typically a tell tale sign and you should contact a medical professional to help take back your life.

Symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder(PTSD)


Symptoms can develop within one month to several years after the event depending on the individual. Also, they can vary from person to person and over time. Intrusive thoughts and memories, avoidance, changes in emotional and physical reactions, and changes in mood and thinking are all normal symptoms an individual can experience.

INTRUSIVE THOUGHTS AND MEMORIES

Symptoms are related to the traumatic event and include:

  • Unwanted, recurrent thoughts and memories that are distressing
  • Flashbacks
  • Night terrors or nightmares
  • Emotional or physical distress when confronted with something that reminds you of the event

AVOIDANCE

Symptoms are related to the traumatic event and include:

  • Avoiding places, people, or activities
  • Avoiding talking about the event
  • Avoiding thinking about the event

EMOTIONAL AND PHYSICAL REACTIONS

Symptoms are related to the traumatic event and include:

  • Being on guard
  • Self destructive behavior
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Irritability
  • Overwhelming shame/guilt
  • Difficulty concentrations

MOOD AND THINKING

Symptoms are related to the traumatic event and include:

  • Hopelessness
  • Difficulty remembering aspects of the event
  • Emotional dysregulation
  • Numbness
  • Feelings of detachment
  • Lack of interest
  • Negative thoughts about yourself and the world around you

Causes and Risk Factors


While PTSD is often linked to combat veterans, anyone experiencing a traumatic event can develop the disorder. All demographics are at risk, but individual coping abilities and treatment access can affect susceptibility. For instance, non-Latino whites show lower PTSD rates due to more accessible resources.

TRAUMATIC EVENTS

Traumatic events vary from person to person and no experience is inherently the same. Below we will outline different traumatic events that put individuals at risk for PTSD:

  • Combat exposure: Military war zones, gang violence
  • Natural disasters: Tornados, hurricanes, earthquakes, pandemics, etc.
  • Sexual violence
  • Physical violence
  • Unexpected loss of a loved one
  • Accidents: Fires, drowning, automobile, etc.
  • Life-threatening medical diagnosis: Cancer, organ failure, autoimmune diseases, etc.
  • Torture: Psychological, emotional, and physical
  • Threatening of physical harm: By use of weapons, persons, or objects

Health Effects of Post traumatic stress disorder(PTSD)


PTSD can negatively impact your home, relationships, job, and physical, emotional, and mental health. Experiencing chronic stress is especially detrimental in regards to one’s overall wellbeing. The negative effects of PTSD can occur simultaneously and intensify one another. Below we will outline the effects of PTSD when looking at one’s physical and mental health and how their lifestyle is impacted:

PHYSICAL HEALTH

  • Increased blood pressure
  • Aches and pains
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea

MENTAL HEALTH

  • Increased blood pressure
  • Aches and pains
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea

LIFESTYLE

  • Increased blood pressure
  • Aches and pains
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
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How We Treat

Various PTSD treatment options are available that can be tailored to fit individual needs. Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery, an outpatient therapist team in New Jersey, Florida, and Maryland, is ready to help. Our specialists work with you or a loved one to overcome PTSD symptoms, providing tools for long-term success. Don’t lose hope; recovery starts here!

COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (CBT)

CBT is a form of psychotherapy that has been proven to help combat most mental health disorders. It aims to help individuals modify their thinking patterns and behaviors by identifying distortions. By focusing on the relationship between thoughts, emotions, and behaviors, clinicians are able to help their clients understand that positively changing one can impact the function of the others.

AVOIDANCE

Exposure therapy can be highly effective but also intimidating depending on the individual. Only if you or a loved one feels comfortable, should it be done as it can be distressing initially. Clinicians will use the triggers of your traumatic event to combat the reactions by prolonged exposure. This will be done in a controlled environment and the aim is for the individual to face their fears and develop long lasting coping skills.

EMOTIONAL AND PHYSICAL REACTIONS

Group therapy is good for individuals who cope well by relation to others and their experiences. While we mentioned prior that no traumatic event looks exactly the same, people can still find aspects of their event in others. It is human nature to want to connect to others and feel seen and understood, especially when discussing extremely personal and difficult situations. Family therapy can be beneficial as well because the whole household can be affected by the distress of the person experiencing PTSD.

How do I begin?


Our team is dually and expertly trained in the Treatment of Eating Disorders and DBT for Mental Health. Our Evidenced-Based approaches include FBT, CBT-E, DBT-ED, and Comprehensive DBT for co-occurring mental health conditions. Our outpatient practice has helped Children, Teens and Adults achieve full Eating Disorder Recovery and Mental Health Stability for over 25 years.

1

Schedule your 15 minute free phone consultation

This phone screening is highly confidential to help determine if coming to the Resilience practice is the best course for you or your loved one.

2

Complete an Expert and Comprehensive Intake

During your intake appointment we will gather more information to identify your stressors and needs. And work with you to develop your resilience treatment plan.

3

Get connected with Your Personalized Care Team

Meet with a practitioner to get started on your journey of healing and wellness you know you deserve.

Start Your Path To Recovery


Find Recovery & Healing Today

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

What is Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?


Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is characterized as a chronic long-lasting disorder where an individual has uncontrollable recurring thoughts and/or behaviors. The compulsions and obsessions become time-consuming and/or cause significant distress for the individual. They may find it hard to function in important areas in their lives, such as, social or occupational settings. OCD symptoms do not come from physiological effects of a substance; such as drug or alcohol abuse and medication. When clinicians are identifying OCD they have to take into consideration other mental disorders as symptoms can be similar. However, the disturbance itself cannot be better explained by another disorder.

In order to fully understand the disorder it is important to know the difference between obsessions and compulsions. We will outline them below:

OBSESSIONS:

The two characterizations of obsessions as defined by the DSM-V are:

  • Persistent intrusive and unwanted thoughts, urges, or images experienced during some point of the disturbance that causes the individual anxiety and distress.
  • Attempting to ignore or suppress the intrusive thought, urges, or images. In some cases, trying to neutralize them through compulsions.

COMPULSIONS:

The characterizations of compulsions as defined by the DSM-V are:

  • Repetitive behaviors such as:
    • Ordering
    • Checking
    • Handwashing
  • Mental acts such as:
    • Counting
    • Repeating words or phrases internally
    • Praying

The individual will perform these acts in the hope to prevent or reduce anxiety or distress. However, the acts become excessive and do not work in the way they were intended. It is important to note that children may have difficulty articulating the reasoning behind their mental acts or behaviors, but this does not mean that they cannot develop OCD.

Symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder


Symptoms of OCD can vary in severity and look different for obsessions and compulsions. They do not respond to logic and the individual can exemplify feelings of annoyance, irritability, panic, discomfort, disgust, and distress when feeling out of control. Below we have outlined symptoms to look out for a loved one or yourself:

OBSESSIONS:

  • Fear of contamination
  • Fear of harm to loved ones or oneself
  • Excessive sense of responsibility to prevent danger
  • Intrusive recurring thoughts and images of violence, sex, and catastrophes
  • Excessive obsession with exactness, orderliness, symmetry, illness, morality, and religion.
  • The need to know things and remember them

COMPULSIONS:

  • Excessive focus on hygiene (showering, brushing teeth, washing hands)
  • Excessive cleaning
  • Excessive checking of safety (locks and appliances)
  • Repetitive routine of actions/activities
  • Repetition of words and phrases
  • Counting, tapping, and touching in a routine way a certain number of times
  • Rules and patterns applied to inanimate objects

Causes and Risk Factors


While research is ongoing as to what causes OCD, there are several theories. Because compulsions are learned behaviors, when associated with relief from anxiety they become excessive among other reasons. Due to the obsessions being disconnected from reality the beliefs reinforce and maintain symptoms.

We will break down other causes and risk factors associated with obsessive compulsive disorder below:

GENETICS

Studies show that genetics are a risk factor. Individuals with a family history of OCD are more likely to develop it than those who do not. Individuals with first-degree relatives that have OCD, such as parents and siblings, have a higher risk of developing it. Furthermore, If the first-degree relative developed OCD as a child or teen the risk is higher. Research on genetic associations to OCD are ongoing, hoping to provide more insight on how to combat the disorder.

BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

Imaging studies show differences between individuals with OCD and those who do not have it in the frontal cortex and subcortical structures of the brain. The frontal cortex is associated with key functions such as consciousness, communication, memory, motivation, attention, and decision making. Similarly, the subcortical structures of the brain are closely associated with complex activities such as memory, emotion, pleasure, and production of hormones. Chemical abnormalities can also be found from individuals with obsessive compulsive disorder.

ENVIRONMENT

Growing up in a household with an individual who has OCD can later affect the individual. The routine and exposure to compulsive behaviors and obsessions can be mimicked in their own life. For instance, a child who is exposed to a strict regimen of extreme cleaning may find it difficult to adjust on their own or with a partner later in life especially if they themselves develop OCD.

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Negative Health Effects


You or a loved one will be subject to a reduced quality of life in the event the symptoms of OCD cannot be managed. The following negative short and long term health effects can be experienced:

  • development of other mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety
  • Increased risk of substance abuse
  • Suicidal thoughts when feeling out of control

Treatment Options

Clinicians use medication and/or psychotherapy to treat symptoms of OCD depending on the severity and responsiveness of the individual’s treatment plan. While OCD can be treatable, some individuals continue to have symptoms. It is also not uncommon for them to also have other mental disorders. Anxiety, depression, and body dysmorphia, are important mental disorders to consider when considering treatment options.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

The most common type of psychotherapy used to treat OCD is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). More specifically, Exposure and Response Prevention (EX/RP) is helpful in reducing compulsive behaviors in individuals who have trouble responding to SRI medication. It pushes the individual to acknowledge their triggering situation, then prevents them from dealing with it through compulsion. Clinicians and patients will work together to find the right fit as treatment for mental disorders are usually personalized.

MEDICATION:

Clinicians use medication and/or psychotherapy to treat symptoms of OCD depending on the severity and responsiveness of the individual’s treatment plan. While OCD can be treatable, some individuals continue to have symptoms. It is also not uncommon for them to also have other mental disorders. Anxiety, depression, and body dysmorphia, are important mental disorders to consider when considering treatment options.

How We Treat

Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery are a team of Outpatient Therapists in New Jersey, Florida, Maryland. If you or a loved one suffers from obsessive compulsive disorder, we are here to help. Our team of dedicated specialists and clinicians strive to help anyone suffering come out on the other end with viable tools for long term success. Do not give up, a full recovery is within your grasp. The first step starts here!

How do I begin?


Our team is dually and expertly trained in the Treatment of Eating Disorders and DBT for Mental Health. Our Evidenced-Based approaches include FBT, CBT-E, DBT-ED, and Comprehensive DBT for co-occurring mental health conditions. Our outpatient practice has helped Children, Teens and Adults achieve full Eating Disorder Recovery and Mental Health Stability for over 25 years.

1

Schedule your 15 minute free phone consultation

This phone screening is highly confidential to help determine if coming to the Resilience practice is the best course for you or your loved one.

2

Complete an Expert and Comprehensive Intake

During your intake appointment we will gather more information to identify your stressors and needs. And work with you to develop your resilience treatment plan.

3

Get connected with Your Personalized Care Team

Meet with a practitioner to get started on your journey of healing and wellness you know you deserve.

Start Your Path To Recovery


Find Recovery & Healing Today

Subscribe to our Newsletter
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Panic Disorder

What is Panic Disorder?


Panic disorder is a mental health issue involving recurring, unexpected panic attacks, affecting roughly 2.7% of US adults. The impact of these symptoms can cause significant distress and alter life patterns.

The frequency and severity of panic attacks can vary greatly between individuals. Besides panic attacks, people with panic disorder often worry about future panic attacks and the symptoms experienced during them, like chest pain and feelings of detachment or unreality.

Those affected may modify their daily routines to avert panic attacks, potentially avoiding people, places, or situations believed to trigger these episodes. The symptoms of panic disorder aren’t caused by other medical or mental health conditions or substance abuse.

A panic attack is an intense fear or discomfort surge, peaking within minutes and manifesting various symptoms. The American Psychological Association lists potential symptoms as:

  • Heart palpitations or rapid heart rate
  • Sweating
  • Trembling or shaking
  • Shortness of breath or smothering feelings
  • Choking sensation
  • Chest discomfort or pain
  • Nausea or abdominal distress
  • Dizziness, unsteadiness, light-headedness or fainting
  • Chills or heat sensations
  • Numbness or tingling sensations
  • Feeling detached from oneself or experiencing unreality
  • Fears of losing control, going mad, or dying

Recovery Starts Here

Causes and Risk Factors


Typically, panic disorder symptoms start between ages 20-24. Those prone to negative emotions or worry about anxiety’s harmful effects, those with prior sub-threshold panic experiences, individuals with a history of childhood abuse, smokers, and those with respiratory illnesses are at higher risk. Identifiable stressors like relationship issues or health concerns often precede symptoms. Children of parents with anxiety, depression, or bipolar disorders are also at increased risk of developing panic disorder.

Recovery Starts Here

How We Treat

Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery is a group of outpatient therapists based in New Jersey, Florida, and Maryland, offering services for mental health issues, including panic disorder. Our team, proficient in various treatments like DBT, CBT, CBT-E, Family-Based Therapy, and Expressive Arts Therapies, tailors the therapy to individual needs. If you’re grappling with panic attacks and require treatment, reach out to learn how we can assist you.

How do I begin?


Our team is dually and expertly trained in the Treatment of Eating Disorders and DBT for Mental Health. Our Evidenced-Based approaches include FBT, CBT-E, DBT-ED, and Comprehensive DBT for co-occurring mental health conditions. Our outpatient practice has helped Children, Teens and Adults achieve full Eating Disorder Recovery and Mental Health Stability for over 25 years.

1

Schedule your 15 minute free phone consultation

This phone screening is highly confidential to help determine if coming to the Resilience practice is the best course for you or your loved one.

2

Complete an Expert and Comprehensive Intake

During your intake appointment we will gather more information to identify your stressors and needs. And work with you to develop your resilience treatment plan.

3

Get connected with Your Personalized Care Team

Meet with a practitioner to get started on your journey of healing and wellness you know you deserve.

Start Your Path To Recovery


Find Recovery & Healing Today

Subscribe to our Newsletter
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Social Anxiety Disorder

At Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery, we focus on treating mental health disorders that contribute to eating disorders through the use of Dialectic Behavioral Therapy (DBT). One of the associated mental disorders that we focus on is Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). In addition to treating children, teens, and adults, we also provide family therapy services. This page is dedicated to helping you understand the basics of Social Anxiety Disorder and how we can help you if you suffer from this disorder.

What is Social Anxiety Disorder?


Social settings and big events can be intimidating to most people. However, individuals who dread or avoid social settings and events due to the fear that they will be judged or scrutinized by others experience social anxiety disorder. The feelings of anxiety and fear people face with this disorder can be so intense that it feels uncontrollable. While in some situations they push through it, they experience a great deal of distress. There are some individuals who have anxiety related to social performances. Public speaking and competing are some examples.

Symptoms of Social Anxiety Disorder


Symptoms can be physical or psychological and can vary in severity. Below we will breakdown what to look for:

PHYSICAL

  • Nausea
  • Shaking/trembling
  • Dizziness
  • Lightheadedness
  • Increased heart rate
  • Sweating
  • Blushing
  • Speech inhibition
  • Stomach issues
  • Shortness of breath

PSYCHOLOGICAL:

  • Excessive worrying about:
    • Social situations
    • Events
    • Embarrassing yourself
    • Being noticed that you are nervous or stressed
  • Avoiding social activities
  • Trying to go unnoticed if you have to attend an event/social setting
  • Utilizing alcohol or drugs to help endure social situations
  • Excessive anxiety
  • Feelings of self-consciousness

Causes and Risk Factors


Social Anxiety Disorder can affect all ages and genders, and the causes will vary from person to person. It typically begins in late childhood and can be hard to spot. Avoidance of social gatherings and extreme shyness are not always perceived as signs that someone has SAD. Genetics also play a role by influencing the parts of the brain responsible for anxiety and fear. Individuals who have family members that struggle with anxiety disorders have a higher risk of inheriting an anxiety disorder themselves. In addition to genetics, environmental factors can influence social anxiety disorder. Living in an environment where the primary caregivers exemplify anxious characteristics in social settings can influence the child to mimic those behaviors.

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Effects of Social Anxiety Disorder


The effects of SAD can make it difficult for the individual suffering to complete their day to day. Tasks that most people would see as easy become very challenging for them. If not treated, individuals can suffer for a span of years, or even a lifetime. Below are some examples:

Day to day events that can be affected:

  • Having to ask a question
  • Using public restrooms
  • Engaging in extracurricular activities
  • Going to work

Some long term effects can be:

  • Difficulty maintaining current and new relationships
  • Lower life satisfaction
  • Loneliness
  • Substance abuse

Recovery Starts Here

Treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder


Treatment options for social anxiety disorder are medication, psychotherapy, or a mixture of the two. Psychotherapy, better known as talk therapy, encompasses conversations between the clinician and the individual. They work on identifying the issue at hand and encourage altering negative behaviors and thoughts. Psychotherapy is typically the first line of defense. Depending on the severity of the disorder, clinicians will introduce medication to help. Another uncommon strategy people may use is support groups. It can be helpful to know that other people in the world share the same struggles.

MEDICATION

The most common medications used to combat symptoms of social anxiety disorder are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). SSRIs help increase the levels of serotonin in your brain, which helps send messages to your brain effectively. Beta-blockers can also be used to help mediate physical symptoms of social anxiety disorder. They have been found to be particularly helpful for people who struggle more with performance social anxiety. Administering medication can be a process, as clinicians strive to identify the proper dosage. It is not uncommon for patients to go through a trial of medication to find the best suit for them and their needs.

COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (CBT)

CBT is a form of psychotherapy that has been proven to help combat most mental health disorders, especially those related to anxiety. It aims to help individuals modify their thinking patterns and behaviors. Exposure therapy is also a component of cognitive behavioral therapy and has been shown to help in cases such as social anxiety disorder. While there is a wide variety of approaches within CBT, it is important to find what works best for you when teaming up with a clinician.

How We Treat

Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery are a team of Outpatient Therapists in New Jersey, Florida, Maryland. If you or a loved one suffers from social anxiety disorder, we are here to help. Our team of dedicated specialists and clinicians strive to help anyone suffering come out on the other end with viable tools for long term success. Do not give up, a full recovery is within your grasp. The first step starts here!

How do I begin?


Our team is dually and expertly trained in the Treatment of Eating Disorders and DBT for Mental Health. Our Evidenced-Based approaches include FBT, CBT-E, DBT-ED, and Comprehensive DBT for co-occurring mental health conditions. Our outpatient practice has helped Children, Teens and Adults achieve full Eating Disorder Recovery and Mental Health Stability for over 25 years.

1

Schedule your 15 minute free phone consultation

This phone screening is highly confidential to help determine if coming to the Resilience practice is the best course for you or your loved one.

2

Complete an Expert and Comprehensive Intake

During your intake appointment we will gather more information to identify your stressors and needs. And work with you to develop your resilience treatment plan.

3

Get connected with Your Personalized Care Team

Meet with a practitioner to get started on your journey of healing and wellness you know you deserve.

Start Your Path To Recovery


Find Recovery & Healing Today

Subscribe to our Newsletter
Our Professional Affiliations

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

What is Generalized Anxiety Disorder?


Experiencing anxiety and worry throughout life is normal. When an individual experiences prolonging intense worry and/or anxiety there is a high likelihood of them developing generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The Diagnostic and statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), 5th edition, defines generalized anxiety disorder as the following:

  • The presence of excessive anxiety and worry.
  • Worry occurs more often than not for six months or more and is clearly excessive.
  • The individual finds it difficult to control the worry.
  • The worry and anxiety is accompanied by at least three of the following and is present more often than not for the past six months:
    • Edginess or restlessness
    • Fatigued more than usual
    • Impaired concentration or feeling as though the mind has gone blank.
    • Observable and/or non observable irritability.
    • Increased muscle tension.
    • Difficulty sleeping brought on by trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, restlessness at night, or unsatisfying sleep.

Causes and Risk Factors


Generalized anxiety disorder is caused by a mix of environmental and biological factors. When given the proper tools to combat them, the risk is lower. However, acquiring the tools can be challenging within itself.

Individuals could be at risk due to one or more of the following environmental and biological factors:

  • Chronic stress
  • Family history of anxiety and/or mood disorders
  • Substance abuse
  • Low socioeconomic status
  • Catastrophic environmental/social events
    • Divorce
    • Loss of a loved one
    • Hurricane
    • War

Recovery Starts Here

Symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder


One of the most important steps on the road to recovery is being able to identify the symptoms to properly diagnose. Symptoms of GAD can be characterized as physical or mental but can also be observable or unobservable. Such as the following:

  • Excessive worrying
  • Trouble controlling the worry
  • Feelings of nervousness
  • Trouble relaxing/restless
  • Easily startled
  • Trouble getting adequate sleep/rest
  • Fatigue, easily tired
  • Aches and pains

  • Difficulty swallowing
  • tremble/twitch
  • Irritability
  • Sweat easily and a lot
  • Feeling lightheaded or out of breath
  • Frequent bathroom visits

Children, teens, and adults are subject to experiencing the symptoms. Additionally, they can fluctuate over time and can worsen during stress. These symptoms can make it hard for the individual to function in their day to day.

Recovery Starts Here

Negative Health Effects


Excessive worrying and anxiety can negatively impact your health. When an individual is constantly worrying or experiencing anxiety it can lead to chronic stress. While experiencing stress is inevitable throughout life, developing an efficient way to manage it is important for your health in the long run. Cortisol, the stress hormone, acts as our body’s natural alarm system. However prolonged exposure to cortisol can be detrimental to your health. Research has found that reducing levels of cortisol can improve anxiousness in individuals. The inability to reduce stress brought on from worrying and anxiety can negatively impact multiple body systems. Such as, the cardiovascular system and digestive system. Additionally, cognitive processes can be impacted such as memory function.

Recovery Starts Here

Who is Affected By Generalized Anxiety Disorder?


Unfortunately no one is immune to generalized anxiety disorder. It affects children, teens, and adults, as well as, males and females. The reasons behind GAD vary with age group, however, they are generally similar. Below we will explore some reasons why people experience anxiety:

CHILDREN/TEENS:

  • Performance at school or sports
  • Catastrophes (war, natural disasters)
  • Social expectations
  • Health/wellbeing of loved ones

ADULTS:

  • Job security/performance
  • Health/wellbeing of themselves and their loved ones
  • Money
  • Day to day responsibilities
  • Being late

Also, individuals who excessively use caffeine and/or tobacco products are more likely to trigger and worsen their anxiety.

Treatment Options For Generalized Anxiety Disorder


COUNSELING AND THERAPY

Counseling and therapy is a standard treatment for generalized anxiety disorder. This might include psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, or other forms of counseling.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, or CBT, is one of the most common forms of psychotherapy used for generalized anxiety disorder. This form of psychotherapy helps a sufferer to be made aware of negative thought patterns they may be experiencing that can trigger disturbed feelings. CBT also can help you change the way you react to these negative feelings.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

While DBT shares similar qualities to other cognitive-behavioral approaches, certain elements are required to distinguish it. Such as:

  • Serving the five functions of treatment:
    • Motivating the client
    • Teaching skills
    • Generalizing skills to natural environments
    • Motivating and improving therapy skills
    • Structuring the treatment environment
  • Biosocial theory
  • Focusing on emotions in treatment
  • Consistent dialectical philosophy
  • Mindfulness and acceptance-oriented interventions

Dialectical philosophy poses the idea that each opposing force is incomplete on its own. Such as, focusing completely on change-oriented efforts leaves no room for acceptance of the patient and focusing on complete acceptance of the patient can be ineffective due to the requirement of extensive changes in their lives.

DBT strives to set in place explicit rules for success by replacing behaviors that are unhealthy, self-defeating, and self-damaging, with healthy coping skills and behaviors. In order to be successful there has to be motivation and patience from both the therapist and the patient.

LIFESTYLE CHANGES AND NATURAL REMEDIES

Lifestyle changes can have a big impact on your mental health, including those who suffer from generalized anxiety disorder. These daily lifestyle changes can include:

  • Getting adequate sleep
  • Having a spiritual or religious practice
  • Implementing a meditation practice
  • Eating healthy
  • Avoiding alcoholic beverages, cigarettes, and caffeinated beverages

For some, implementing lifestyle changes is enough to reduce anxiety levels. However, for some, therapy is needed.

MEDICATIONS

Medications are often common treatments for anxiety disorders. Medicines can help you control some of the physical or mental symptoms that Generalized Anxiety Disorder brings. Some common medications include: SSRIs, Tricyclics, and Benzodiazepines.

How We Treat

Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery are a team of Outpatient Therapists in New Jersey, Florida, Maryland. If you or a loved one suffers from generalized anxiety disorder, we are here to help. Our team of dedicated specialists and clinicians strive to help anyone suffering come out on the other end with viable tools for long term success. Do not give up, a full recovery is within your grasp. The first step starts here!

How do I begin?


Our team is dually and expertly trained in the Treatment of Eating Disorders and DBT for Mental Health. Our Evidenced-Based approaches include FBT, CBT-E, DBT-ED, and Comprehensive DBT for co-occurring mental health conditions. Our outpatient practice has helped Children, Teens and Adults achieve full Eating Disorder Recovery and Mental Health Stability for over 25 years.

1

Schedule your 15 minute free phone consultation

This phone screening is highly confidential to help determine if coming to the Resilience practice is the best course for you or your loved one.

2

Complete an Expert and Comprehensive Intake

During your intake appointment we will gather more information to identify your stressors and needs. And work with you to develop your resilience treatment plan.

3

Get connected with Your Personalized Care Team

Meet with a practitioner to get started on your journey of healing and wellness you know you deserve.

Start Your Path To Recovery


Find Recovery & Healing Today

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Anxiety Disorders

Treating Anxiety


Anxiety is a mental health concern that has received a significant amount of attention in the media which has increased awareness of anxiety symptoms. This has had a positive impact on the stigma associated with anxiety symptoms which has led to an open dialog regarding to anxiety disorders.

Types of Anxiety


What may come as a surprise, is that there are several different types of anxiety disorders that have different symptoms associated with them. Anxiety treatment programs will be dependent on the specific anxiety disorder that the individual is struggling with.

Get The Help You Need

SEPARATION ANXIETY DISORDER

Separation anxiety disorder occurs when an individual feels an inappropriate amount of fear or anxiety when being separated from someone they are attached to (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). This could mean that they feel distress when they know they will be separated, worrying that their loved ones will experience danger or harm, and refusal to go to work, school, or other locations without their attachment figure (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). For children, the symptoms last a minimum of 4 weeks, whereas for adults’ symptoms last for a minimum of 6 months (American Psychiatric Association, 2013)

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GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER

Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by having an excessive amount of worry more days than not for a minimum of 6 months (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Other symptoms include having difficulty controlling the worry, feeling restless or on edge, fatigue, poor concentration, irritability, muscle tension, and sleep disturbances (American Psychiatric Association, 2013).

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OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER

Obsessive compulsive disorder is not considered an anxiety disorder; however, symptoms may present similarly to anxiety disorders. Individuals living with obsessive compulsive disorder can struggle with obsessions, compulsions, or both. Obsessions are described as persistent thoughts that are difficult to suppress or relieve (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Compulsions are described as repetitive behaviors that they feel driven to engage in (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The symptoms that a person experiences will take up a lot of their time, and cause them distress.

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Sad caucasian teenage girl lying on bed and looking away with anxiety

PANIC DISORDER

Obsessive compulsive disorder is not considered an anxiety disorder; however, symptoms may present similarly to anxiety disorders. Individuals living with obsessive compulsive disorder can struggle with obsessions, compulsions, or both. Obsessions are described as persistent thoughts that are difficult to suppress or relieve (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Compulsions are described as repetitive behaviors that they feel driven to engage in (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The symptoms that a person experiences will take up a lot of their time, and cause them distress.

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POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER

Similar to obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) does not fall into the category of anxiety disorders. However, some of the symptoms may resemble anxiety. PTSD can develop after a person is exposed to death, death threats, serious injury, or sexual violence (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). PTSD is a complex mental health concern with a wide range of symptoms. For example, individuals may struggle with flashbacks, nightmares, avoidance of distressing memories, feeling detached, and hyperviolence (American Psychiatric Association, 2013).

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Sad woman looking out of window at home

SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

Social anxiety can be described as feeling anxious or worried about situations that the individual could be judged or scrutinized by others (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). This can occur in social situations, while performing, or by being watched by others. Individuals worry that if others can pick up on their anxiety in these situations that they will be seen in a negative light. Social anxiety can cause a significant amount of distress and impact a person’s social relationships, romantic relationships, and their career.

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PHOBIAS

Phobias occur when an individual experiences significant fear or anxiety regarding a specific situation or object. The situation or object will always lead to fear or anxiety, which leads to the individual doing their best to avoid the situation or object. The symptoms associated with a specific phobia will have a significant impact on a person’s day to day life and last more than 6 months (American Psychiatric Association, 2013).

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sad girl looking out the window

How We Treat


effective recovery is one step away

Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery are a team of Outpatient Therapists in New Jersey, Florida, Maryland. Our therapists are ready and equipped with clinical services to provide healing for a variety of mental health concerns.

At Resilience DBT & Eating Recovery, we are equipped to provide you with a tailored approach to anxiety treatment. Our staff is trained in a variety of therapeutic approaches that have been clinically proven in their effectiveness in anxiety treatment. We recognize the individual differences that occur with anxiety disorders and believe that you get the most from treatment when we work together to develop your treatment plan and goals.

How do I begin?


Our team is dually and expertly trained in the Treatment of Eating Disorders and DBT for Mental Health. Our Evidenced-Based approaches include FBT, CBT-E, DBT-ED, and Comprehensive DBT for co-occurring mental health conditions. Our outpatient practice has helped Children, Teens and Adults achieve full Eating Disorder Recovery and Mental Health Stability for over 25 years.

1

Schedule your 15 minute free phone consultation

This phone screening is highly confidential to help determine if coming to the Resilience practice is the best course for you or your loved one.

2

Complete an Expert and Comprehensive Intake

During your intake appointment we will gather more information to identify your stressors and needs. And work with you to develop your resilience treatment plan.

3

Get connected with Your Personalized Care Team

Meet with a practitioner to get started on your journey of healing and wellness you know you deserve.

Start Your Path To Recovery


Find Recovery & Healing Today

Subscribe to our Newsletter
Our Professional Affiliations